CMS modules by everest poker.

Titles of evaluated learning experiences

The New York City Fire Department Emergency Medical Service (FDNY-EMS), the nation’s largest emergency pre-hospital care provider, serves the more than 8,000,000 residents and visitors of the five boroughs of the City of New York. Operating through a 911 police emergency notification system, the FDNY-EMS responds daily to almost 3,000 requests for emergency medical assistance with both basic and advanced life support ambulances.

The EMS Division of Training (previously under the auspices of the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation) has been an EMS educational leader in New York State since 1974. Now merged with the Bureau of Training of the New York City Fire Department, the EMS Academy, located on the grounds of Fort Totten, overlooking Little Neck Bay, is an approved New York State Department of Health EMS Course Sponsor.

The FDNY-EMS Academy offers a variety of basic and refresher courses, emergency vehicle operations, supervisory preparedness, continuing medical education and quality assurance workshops to the more than 2,800 EMS employees. Since 1994, EMS has certified firefighters as First Responders, adding another dimension of pre-hospital care to the people of New York City. EMS is also responsible for training firefighters and other city agency employees in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

The FDNY-EMS Academy provides students with a comprehensive exposure to urban emergency medical care in both a socially and economically diverse metropolis. Students undertake clinical rotations in hospitals that specialize in trauma, limb replantation, burns, hyperbaric therapy and poisonous snake-bite treatment.

All Academy courses are full-time endeavors: the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basic Course is presented in eight weeks, and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV-Paramedic Basic Course is presented in 34 weeks. All curricula meet and exceed the guidelines set by the United States Department of Transportation, American Heart Association, the New York State Department of Health and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee. Instructor qualifications exceed the requirements set forth by the New York State Department of Health EMS Program. Presently, the FDNY-EMS Academy has eleven New York State Department of Health EMS Program Regional Faculty Members on its staff. New York State Regional Faculty Members are responsible for EMS program, instructor training, as well as program development and review.

Source of official student records: Office of the Registrar, FDNY Bureau of Training EMS Division, Fort Totten-Building #325, Bayside, New York 11359.

  • Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Instructor Refresher (INS 400R)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course (PRH 300R)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP) (PRH 302)
  • Advanced Leadership in Emergency Medical Service – Captain’s Course (MNG 300)
  • Certified First Responder (CFR) Program (PRH 100)
  • Certified First Responder-Defibrillation (CFR-D) Program
  • Certified First Responder(CFR) Refresher Program (PRH 100R)
  • Certified First Responder-Defibrillation (CFR-D) Refresher Program
  • Certified Instructor Coordinator (INS 302)
  • Certified Lab Instructor (INS 300)
  • CPR-Basic Life Support Providers Course C (CPR 102)
  • CPR-Instructor (INS 200)
  • Emergency Medical Dispatch - Assignment Receiving Dispatcher (EMD-ARD)(COM 200)
  • Emergency Medical Dispatch - Radio Dispatcher (EMD-RD) (COM 201)
  • Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200)
  • Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course (PRH 200R)
  • Emergency Vehicle Operators’ Course (EVOC) (VEH 203)
  • EMS Rescue Medical Tehcnician II (SOC 206)
  • Hazardous Mateials Medical Technicial II (SOC 101)
  • Hazardous Materials Medical Technician II Refresher (SOC 221)
  • Lieutenant Orientation Program (MNG 200)
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Instructor (INS 401)
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Providers Course (CPR 300)
  • Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Cadet (PRH 202)
  • Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - EMT (PRH 201)
  • Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic (PRH 303)
  • Credit Recommendation

Descriptions and credit recommendations

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Instructor Refresher (INS 400R)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates: September 1993 - Present.
Objectives: Teach the theory and principles of ACLS care to students; administer the ACLS provider course; and possess the knowledge and skills to meet the performance guidelines of the American Heart Association ACLS course.
Instruction: Topics covered include: administration; teaching and learning in the American Heart Association ACLS course; the chain of survival; airway management; cardiac rhythms; defibrillation; cardioversion; transcutaneous pacing; intravenous cannulation; acute ischemic stroke; resuscitation methods; ethics and legal issues associated with ACLS and the withholding of care. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, audio/visual material, observation, and student presentation.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (9/03 - review conducted by the American Council on Education) (10/07). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course (PRH 300)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 1,115 hours (34 weeks); includes 655 hours didactic, 260 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 2 and 3: 1,245 hours (34 weeks); includes 801 hours didactic, 244 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 4: 1100 hours. Version 5: 1662 hours (40 weeks) includes 912 didactic and 750 field and clinical.
Dates:Version 1: May 1990 - July 1993. Version 2: August 1993 - September 2000. (Intentional gap between Versions 2 and 3.) Version 3: January 2004 - December 2006. Version 4: January 2007 - January 2012. Version 5: February 2012 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5: Appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic antishock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job.
Instruction: Version 1, 2, 3, or 4: This program is designed to provide the advanced education needed by paramedics to administer patient care in the pre-hospital setting. This program covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration, practice, clinical, and field experiences are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Certification Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. Version 5: All of the above plus augmented instruction in cardiology for medical emergencies and trauma approach with enhanced interactive scenario based activities.
Credit recommendation: Version 1 or 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). An additional 17 semester hours is recommended as elective credit in Allied Health Science or as general elective credit (1/91) (3/96 revalidation). Of the 54 semester hours, 3 semester hours may be assigned as Anatomy and Physiology or Human Biology (no laboratory included) and 2 semester hours may be assigned as Medical Terminology. Further, some colleges with nursing degree programs may consider waiving the first semester of nursing courses up to 7 semester hours for individuals who have successfully completed this program. NOTE: Credit should not be given for this program and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP) program. However, the credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course. NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option before December 31, 1995) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has recertified as a Paramedic after May 1990. Credit for Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) and elective credit (17 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has recertified as a Paramedic after May 1990 and has successfully completed all written exams required in the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course offered after May 1990. NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option after January 1, 1996) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study between January 1984 and April 1990 if the individual has recertified as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV through the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) after May 1990. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associates degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Sciences or Emergency Medical Services Technologies (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 42 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (34 lecture, 8 clinical/field). An additional 1 semester hour may be used for health and physical education (6/11). NOTE on Version 4 and 5: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP), and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course (PRH 300R)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 140 hours (4 weeks). Version 2: >112.5 hours (3 weeks).Version 4: 144 hours (18 days).
Dates:Version 1: May 1990 - December 1998.Version 2: January 1999 - October 2006. Version 3: November 2006 - November 2011. Version 4: December 2011 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, or 3:Appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic antishock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job.
Instruction: Version 1:This course reviews the content of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and addresses current trends and issues. This course covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration and practice are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to recertify as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV by sitting for the New York State Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic.) Version 2 or 3: This course reviews the content of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and addresses current trends and issues. This course covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration and practice are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of 8 divisions: preparatory, airway management, patient assessment, trauma, medical, special considerations, assessment based management, operations. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to recertify as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV by sitting for the New York State Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (3/96). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (10/07 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (6/11 revalidation). NOTE on Version 3 and 4: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP), and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP) (PRH 302)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1 or 2: 98 hours (2.5 weeks). Version 3: 112 hours (3 weeks).Version 4: 176 hours (22 days).
Dates: Version 1: February 1996 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - October 2006. Version 3: November 2006 -November 2011. Version 4 : December 2011 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, 3, 4: Appropriately assess patients; make appropriate treatment decisions; make appropriate transportation decisions; record a detailed log of all field activities.
Instruction:Version 1: This course is designed for individuals employed by FDNY-EMS as EMTs, who have completed paramedic training outside the Department and are about to begin working as paramedics. The course covers Advanced Life Support (ALS) equipment inventory, ALS assessment principles, ALS documentation, introduction to FDNY-EMS ALS operations, issues of quality assurance, paramedic roles and responsibilities in FDNY-EMS as presented by the Medical Director of Training and Telemetry Rotation. The course includes lecture; scenario testing, involving medical, trauma, and cardiac arrest scenarios in a simulated clinical setting before and following the field component; a field component involving the course participant as a member of a paramedic unit in the field; a field diary, including properly formatted patient assessment, histories, presumptive diagnoses, treatments, and follow-up at the emergency department; and case study presentations, for which the course participant prepares a research paper on an advanced level medical condition or treatment modality for peer presentation and critique. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic.) Version 2 3 or 4: This course covers Advanced Life Support (ALS) equipment inventory, ALS assessment principles, ALS documentation, introduction to FDNY-EMS ALS operations, issues of quality assurance, paramedic roles and responsibilities in FDNY-EMS. The course includes lecture; scenario testing, involving medical, trauma, and cardiac arrest scenarios in a simulated clinical setting before and following the field component; a field component involving the course participant as a member of a paramedic unit in the field; a field diary, including properly formatted patient assessment, histories, presumptive diagnoses, treatments, and follow-up at the emergency department; and case study presentations, for which the course participant prepares a research paper on an advanced level medical condition or treatment modality for peer presentation and critique.(Prerequisite: New York State certification as a Paramedic.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1 or 2:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: Credit should not be given for this course and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (10/07 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 9 semester hours in Paramedic Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Health Science (6/11 revalidation).
NOTE on Version 3 and 4:
Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP), and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Advanced Leadership in Emergency Medical Service – Captain’s Course (MNG 300)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 75 Hours (10 Days).
Dates: February 2008 – Present.
Objectives: Supervise emergency field command operations; manage comprehensive administrative needs of Emergency Medical Service personnel assigned to the field stations.
Instruction: Administrative responsibilities during field command operations; investigation and cover reports; leadership principles and practices, including emotional intelligence; reviewing performance evaluations; Incident Command Systems: problem solving techniques, decision-making, and communications; MCI radio reports; proper channels of communication; managing organizational relationships; fleet management; conflict resolution; mentoring; facilitated discussion.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, or Allied Health (10/08).

Certified First Responder (CFR) Program (PRH 100)
[Formerly Certified First Responder-Defibrillation (CFR-D) Program)]

Location: New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York (through December 1997); Fort Totten, Bayside, New York (beginning January 1998).
Length: Version 1: 100 hours (2.5weeks). Version 2: 72 hours (10 weeks). Version 3: 64 hours (9 weeks). Version 4: 68 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: August 1994 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - May 2005. Version 3: June 2005 - June 2012. Version 4: July 2012- present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, 3 or 4: Describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.
Instruction: Version 1, 2, 3 or 4: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by first responders to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that the student will be expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR recertification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to sit for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.
Credit recommendation: Version 1, 2, or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/95) (5/00 revalidation) (10/07 revalidation). Version 4:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Management; or in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Managementand in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, and 1 semester hour in health or physical education (6/11 revalidation).

Certified First Responder Refresher Program (PRH 100R)
(Formerly Certified First Responder-Defibrillation (CFR-D) Refresher Program)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Version 2: 33 hours (4 days). Version 3: 37 hours (5 days).
Dates: Version 1: February 1997 - May 2005. Version 2: June 2005 - May 2007. Version 3: June 2007 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, or 3: Describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.
Instruction: Version 1, 2, or 3: This course reviews the content of the Certified First Responder - Defibrillation (CFR-D) course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that the student will be expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR recertification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify by sitting for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.
Credit recommendation: Version 1, 2, or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/00) (5/07 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation). NOTE: Care should be taken in not duplicating credit for refresher courses.

Certified Instructor Coordinator (INS 302)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 24 hours (1.5 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: September 2002 - August 2007; Version 2: September 2007- Present.
Objectives: Use the appropriate instructional methods to teach EMT/Paramedics teach; present information to various age groups.
Instruction: Major topics covered in the course are EMT-B and CFR based modules, handling difficult students, delivering effective presentations, conducting skills examinations, Americans with disabilities and the adult learner.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (10/07). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Certified Lab Instructor (INS 300)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 24 hours (2.5 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: September 2002 - September 2007; Version 2: October 2007- Present.
Objectives: Serve under a certified instructor coordinator as a certified laboratory instructor in either an Emergency Medical Technician or Advanced Emergency Medical Technician course.
Instruction: Major topics covered in the course are teaching the adult learner, teaching BLS lab skills, overview of psychomotor objectives in the EMT-B curriculum, lab skills demo-trauma, medical, pediatric, medical and pediatric cardiac arrest, medical administration devices, upper airway adjuncts and suction, mouth to mask w/supplement oxygen and supplemental oxygen administration.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (10/07). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

CPR-Basic Life Support Providers Course C (CPR 102)

Location: New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York (through December 1997); Fort Totten, Bayside, New York (beginning January 1998).
Length: Version 1 or 2: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates: Version 1: March 1990 - December 1999. Version 2: January 2000 - May 2005.
Objectives: Version 1 or 2: Provide basic life support in cardiac and respiratory emergencies.
Instruction: Version 1: Emergency cardiac care; cardiovascular and respiratory systems; risk factors and prudent heart living; one and two rescuer CPR; airway management; special resuscitation situations; pediatric basic life support; ethical and legal considerations; safety. Version 2: All topics included in Version 1; in addition, introduction to public access defibrillation programs.
Credit recommendation: Version 1 or 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science or Physical Education (5/95) (5/00 revalidation).

CPR-Instructor (INS 200)

Location: New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York (through December 1997); Fort Totten, Bayside, New York (beginning January 1998).
Length: Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Version 2: 32 hours (4 days); in addition, participants complete a formally supervised and evaluated 8 hour classroom teaching demonstration. Version 3: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates: Version 1: March 1990 - December 1999. Version 2: January 2000 - May 2005. Version 3: June 2005 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2, or 3: Teach the CPR-Basic Life Support Providers Course.
Instruction: Version 1: Review of CPR-BLS Providers Course; role of the CPR instructor; nature of the teaching/learning interaction; motivation; teaching psychomotor skills; lesson planning; audio-visual aids; manikin maintenance and decontamination; fielding questions; practical skills evaluation. Each course participant practices didactic and psychomotor skills topic presentations. Version 2 and 3: All topics included in Version 1; in addition, public access defibrillation programs.
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods (5/95). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methods (5/00 revalidation). NOTE: Participants must have successfully completed the 8 hour post-course classroom teaching demonstration to qualify for this credit recommendation. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (10/07 revalidation)(6/11 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Emergency Medical Dispatch - Assignment Receiving Dispatcher (EMD-ARD) (COM 200)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:Version 1: 187 hours (3 weeks). Version 2: 262 hours (4 weeks). Version 3: 225 hours (6 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: January 2002 – January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - February 2012. Version 3: March 2012 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1: Discuss the concept of emergency medical dispatch (EMD); apply the technology used to operate an EMD program; display quality assurance; and perform emergency medical dispatching. Version 2 and 3: Rapidly and efficiently answer and triage 911 assignments; offer each assignment for ambulance dispatch; apply effective communication techniques; discuss the role of the Emergency Communications Center within the 911 system; discuss the role of the communications professional within the 911 system.
Instruction: Version 1, 2, or 3: Major topics covered in the course include emergency medical dispatch models; technological components to EMD; customer service relations; EMD policy; and procedure issues. Methods of instruction include lecture, classroom exercises, A/V materials and computer-assisted instruction. Methods of evaluation include quizzes, final reports and instructor evaluations.
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or vocational category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, or Fire Science and Emergency Management (12/03 - reviewed by the American Council on Education). Version 2:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services or Fire Science and Emergency Management (10/07). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science and Emergency Management, or Communications (6/11).

Emergency Medical Dispatch - Radio Dispatcher (EMD-RD) (COM 201)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:Version 1,2 or 3: 300 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: January 2002 – January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - May 2011. Version 3: June 2011- Present.
Objectives: Version 1, 2 or 3: Process a 911 emergency medical call rapidly and efficiently dispatch the closest, most appropriate ambulance for the 911 assignment. Version 2: Simultaneously administer and handle call assignments, maintaining the status of vehicles, prioritizing calls between the callers, and responding units; discuss the role of the communications professional within the 911 system; identify and coordinate the proper agency response to multiple casualty/large scale incidents (including terrorism and weapons of mass destruction events); coordinate a mutual aid response.
Instruction: Major topics covered in the course include terminology & dispatcher, unit identifier and the dispatch screen, The dispatch monitor and marquee, primary dispatch commands, secondary dispatch commands, database inquiries, error messages, deferring dispatching, radio etiquette, radio air time, accident procedure review, system interrupt procedures & review, and MCI procedures & protocol. Methods of instruction include lecture, projects, presentation, teamwork, video, interactive computer, etc. Methods of evaluation include quizzes, final reports and instructor evaluations.
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or vocational category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, or Fire Science and Emergency Management (12/03 - reviewed by the American Council on Education). Version 2:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services or Fire Science and Emergency Management (10/07).Version 3:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science and Emergency Management, or Communications (6/11).

Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course (PRH 200)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 264 hours (8 weeks); includes 16 hours of field experience. Version 2: 287 hours (8.5 weeks); includes 14 hours of emergency room clinical experience and 80 hours field internship. Version 3: 247 hours (6.5 weeks); includes 16 hours of field rotations and 80 hours field internship. Version 4: 479 hours (12 weeks); includes hours for EVOC, which is recommended for college credit separately and not considered as part of this credit recommendation .Version 5: 593 hours (11 weeks)
Dates: Version 1:January 1990 - June 1994. Version 2: July 1994 - December 1998. Version 3: January 1999 - September 2007. Version 4: October 2007 - October 2011. Version 5: November 2011- Present.
Objectives: Version 1: Discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, automatic external cardiac defibrillation, and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment. Version 2, 3, or 4: Discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized Ambulance Call Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment; demonstrate proper use of semi-automatic defibrillator. Version 5: Includes topics covered in Version 4 with an added 120 hours which includes medical terminology, anatomy and physiology plus 37.5 hours of scenario based training and physical training (Please note: Content and scope exceeds state requirements of an basic EMS course.)
Instruction: Version 1: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations; and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. Version 2: Same as Version 1; in addition, basic life support includes defibrillation and there is additional emphasis on pediatrics and critical trauma care. Version 3 or 4: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, critical trauma care, pathophysiology, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. Version 5: Includes topics covered in Versions 3 and 4 plus an added 120 hours which includes medical terminology, anatomy and physiology plus 37.5 hours of scenario based training and 46 days of physical training. (Please note: Content and scope exceeds state requirements of an basic EMS course.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (1/91). Version 2 or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (3/96 revalidation) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course. NOTE: Credit of 6 semester hours is recommended for study completed through NYC EMS (now FDNY-EMS) between January 1984 and December 1989 if the individual has completed the Emergency Medical Technician Refresher Course through FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) and received recertification as a New York State EMT after 1/90. Credit of 3 semester hours is recommended for study completed through NYC EMS (now FDNY-EMS) prior to January 1984 if the individual recertified as a New York State Emergency Medical Technician through FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) after January 1990. Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (10/07 revalidation). Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 10 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, or Emergency Medical Services; or the credit may be distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, 3 semester hours in Allied Health or Emergency Medical Services, and 1 semester hour in EVOC (7/10). NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course, and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - EMT overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours.

Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course (PRH 200R)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 91 hours (2.5 weeks). Version 2 or 3: 75 hours (2 weeks).
Dates: Version 1: January 1990 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - September 2007. Version 3: October 2007 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1: Discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment. Version 2 or 3: Discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized Ambulance Call Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment; demonstrate proper use of semi-automatic defibrillator.
Instruction: Version 1: This course reviews the content of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations; and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Recertification Examination. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.) Version 2 or 3: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, critical trauma care, pathophysiology, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Recertification Examination. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1 or 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (10/07 revalidation). NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course, and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - EMT overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours.

 

Emergency Vehicle Operators’ Course (EVOC) (VEH 203)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Version 1: 56 hours (8 days). Version 2: 37.5 hours (5 days). Version 3: 52.5 hours (7 days).
Dates: Version 1: January 1995 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - September 2007. Version 3: October 2007 - Present.
Objectives: Version 1 or 2: Develop and utilize safe, accident free, professional ambulance driving techniques; discuss traffic laws, risk factors for ambulance accidents, vehicle handling characteristics, traffic hazards and techniques to avoid them; recognize conditions in and around the vehicle that may affect driving; anticipate developments in traffic and prepare to respond to them.
Instruction: Version 1 or 2: Legal aspects of emergency vehicle operation; FDNY-EMS driving regulations; causes of ambulance accidents; defensive driving attitude analysis; mandatory vehicle inspection; anatomy of a crash; habit defense and ambulance stopping distances; lights and sirens; negotiating the intersection; backing the vehicle; vehicle maintenance and inspection; flare placement and accident situations; fueling vehicles and introduction to the diesel ambulance; steering techniques; use of mirrors; braking turns; safe driving techniques; seat belts; road and weather conditions; expressway operations; diesel operations; rear anti-lock braking systems; effects of alcohol and drugs on vehicle operator. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician or a Paramedic.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as Emergency Vehicle Operations in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Health Sciences (3/96).Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as Emergency Vehicle Operations in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Health Sciences (10/01 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as Emergency Vehicle Operations in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Health Sciences (10/07 revalidation).

Hazardous Materials Medical Technical II (SOC 101)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 80 hours (10 days)
Dates: May 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Students will be able to identify the basic toxicology principles and toxicity of the following materials: halogens, hydrocarbons, asphyxiates, radiologicals, organophosphates, blood agents, nerve agents, acids/bases. Describe the need for and the process of decontamination of personnel and equipment; list the common symptoms of patients exposed to different hazardous materials; demonstrate EMS functions of Haz-Mat IMS: triage, treatment, dispotion and EMS Control; use the proper donning, doffing and usage of all levels of PPE available to the Level II responder; apply medical care and attend to the disposition and transportation of patients.
Instruction: This course is an awareness level training in decontamination and triage of patients exposed to chemicals. Topics include toxicology, air monitoring instruments, radiation survey, chemical protective clothing, and decontamination.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hazardous Materials (7/10).

Hazardous Materials Medical Technical II Refresher (SOC 221)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 37.5 hours (over 2 months)
Dates: August 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Students will reinforce skills and knowledge needed to improve and maintain competency of Haz Mat Technical specializing in the medical management of contaminated patients. Students will demonstrate mastery of a hazardous materials EMS technician as defined in the National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 and 473 as well as the Fire Department of New York/EMS Operating Guide 106-17.
Instruction: This course builds on the knowledge and skills gained from SOC 201 and may include topics such as: respiratory protection, self-contained breathing apparatus; operation of air monitoring, chemical protective clothing, medical management within the hot zone, toxicology, and radiation. Methods of instruction include pre-test, lecture, discussion, case studies, practical exercises and exams.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials, Fire Sciences, Emergency Medical Services, and Occupational Safety (7/10). NOTE: Course is repeated each year; care should be taken not to duplicate credit.

EMS Rescue Medical Technician (SOC 206)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 120 hours (over 12 days)
Dates: September 2005 - Present.
Objectives: Students will be certified to the Awareness and Operations Level in the rescue technical disciplines of high-angle/ropes, confined space, collapse and trench rescue. Students will safely operate in a rescue operation to triage, treat, and assist in the extrication of patients while providing advanced pre-hospital care.
Instruction: This course combines 80 hours of rescue operations training with 40 hours of advanced medical management to enable firefighters to administer medical management techniques during and after rescue operations. Class consists of lecture and supervised field work.
Credit recommendation:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Building Construction, Occupation Safety, Fire Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services, or Health Science and in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Medical Management; or in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Building Construction, Occupational Safety, Fire Services Administration, and Emergency Medical Services (7/10).

EMS Lieutenant Orientation Program (MNG 200)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 150 hours (over 4 weeks)
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Students will identify and apply the cornerstones of leadership; assess public perception and expectations of their new role; compare and contrast leadership strategies; discuss differences in social and leadership skills; identify expectations and strategies of professional communication; use tactical communication skills to elicit voluntary compliance in difficult situations; define emotional control, deflector phrases and apply these principles in real-life scenarios; use the strip phrase-link word-goal phrase approach; identify trigger phrases commonly encountered with the public and subordinates when under stress; practice active listening skills and attending behaviors;utilize communication techniques to create empathy, regain control, clarity and modification and reduce resistance; describe the four levels of appeal; describe and practice the eight essential steps to communicating with people in distress; compare assertive vs. aggressive behaviors; apply adult learning concepts to motivate and eliminate barriers to learning; mediate when needed and evaluate subordinate staff; demonstrate mastery of the new responsibilities and fundamental requirements for success as a Lieutenant; communicate effectively within proper channels and chains of command.
Instruction: This course combines lectures with scenario-based practice incorporating the basic concepts of The One Minute Manager, by Ken Blanchard, preparing candidates for leadership as well as procedural requirements as a lieutenant.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management and Supervision or Communications; or in the lower or upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management/Supervision or Fire Service Administration and 3 semester hours in Communications (7/10).

Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Instructor (INS 401)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates: September 1993 - Present.
Objectives: Teach the theory and principles of pediatric advanced life support care, administer PALS courses, possess the knowledge and skills to reduce the risk of the most common causes of cardiac and death in infants and children, identify and treat pediatric patients in a prearrest condition and perform resuscitation and provide immediate post resuscitation care in infants and children. course.
Instruction: Major topics covered in the course are administration, teaching and learning in the American Heart Association PALS courses, children with special healthcare needs, trauma and spinal immobilization, rapid sequence intubation, newly born resuscitation, coping with death, toxicology and toxidromes, and sedation of pediatric patient. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, audio/visual materials, observation and student presentation.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (9/03 - review conducted by the American Council on Education) (10/07)(6/11 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Provider Course (CPR 300)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates: September 2007 - Present.
Objectives: Efficiently and effectively manage critically ill infants and children, resulting in improved outcomes.
Instruction: Major topics covered include recognition and treatment of infants and children at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest; the systematic approach to pediatric assessment; effective respiratory management; defibrillation and synchronized cardioversion; intraosseous access and fluid bolus administration; and effective resuscitation team dynamics.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science or Physical Education (10/07).

Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Cadet (PRH 202)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Time requirements vary depending upon background of class participants. Instructional time listed below does not include refresher time or EVOC time. Credit is recommended for EVOC separately. Cadet-TOP (for new graduates of the FDNY-EMS sponsored EMT course): 97.5 hours (13 days).
Dates: January 1984 - October 2006.
Objectives: Prepare a standardized patient care report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; properly use and care for emergency equipment; operate safely at track rescues; identify, discuss, and function under multiple casualty incident conditions; categorize, treat, and transport a patient at the scene of a multi-casualty incident; recognize unsafe conditions at the scene of all calls and make proper decisions to ensure personnel safety; transfer, lift, and transport patients in all types of carrying devices; take necessary blood borne pathogens precautions; recognize and identify hazardous materials or potentials thereof; use the proper techniques of infectious waste disposal and personal protection in cases of known and unknown communicable diseases; identify and discuss Right to Know Law and how it operates; apply and function under the operating guide procedures.
Instruction: This program is designed to provide a bridge between training programs and work in the field, as well as an orientation to FDNY-EMS policies and procedures. Topics include: Program orientation; medical-legal, patient assessment; vital signs; anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular emergencies; respiratory anatomy and physiology; respiratory emergencies; soft tissue injuries; shock and MAST; head, neck, and spine injuries; chest, abdomen, and groin injuries; communicable and infectious disease control procedures; extremity trauma; medical emergencies; ambulance operations; patient care documentation and history taking; domestic violence; environmental emergencies; critical incident stress management; trauma intervention; stress and burnout; behavioral emergencies; triage (simple triage and rapid treatment); IV maintenance; emergency medical action plan; multiple casualty incidents; track safety; hazardous materials awareness; blood borne pathogens; AIDS and HIV awareness; on-scene personnel safety; pediatric emergencies; OB/GYN lifts and carries; kinematics; EMT-Defibrillation; critical trauma care; airway maintenance and oxygen therapy; history taking; FDNY-EMS operating guide procedures; communications orientation; special operations; respiratory fit testing; Right to Know; personnel and union representatives issues. (Prerequisite: Employment with FDNY-EMS as a New York State certified EMT.)
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (3/96) (10/01 revalidation).

Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - EMT (PRH 201)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Time requirements vary depending upon background of class participants. EMT-TOP (for individuals being hired by FDNY-EMS as EMTs who received their EMT training elsewhere): Version 1: 97.5 hours (13 days).Instructional time listed below does not include refresher time or EVOC time. Credit is recommended for EVOC separately. Version 2: 337 hours (46 days).(Instructional time includes Refresher time and EVOC time. Credit is recommended for EVOC separately and Refresher separately; therefore, please refer to the explanatory note at the end of this exhibit.) Version 3: 360 hours (48 consecutive days).
Dates: Version 1: January 1984 - September 2006. Version 2: October 2006 - Present. Version 3: November 2011- Present.
Objectives: Prepare a standardized patient care report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; properly use and care for emergency equipment; operate safely at track rescues; identify, discuss, and function under multiple casualty incident conditions; categorize, treat, and transport a patient at the scene of a multi-casualty incident; recognize unsafe conditions at the scene of all calls and make proper decisions to ensure personnel safety; transfer, lift, and transport patients in all types of carrying devices; take necessary blood borne pathogens precautions; recognize and identify hazardous materials or potentials thereof; use the proper techniques of infectious waste disposal and personal protection in cases of known and unknown communicable diseases; identify and discuss Right to Know Law and how it operates; apply and function under the operating guide procedures.
Instruction: This program is designed to provide a bridge between training programs and work in the field, as well as an orientation to FDNY-EMS policies and procedures. Topics include: Program orientation; medical-legal, patient assessment; vital signs; anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular emergencies; respiratory anatomy and physiology; respiratory emergencies; soft tissue injuries; shock and MAST; head, neck, and spine injuries; chest, abdomen, and groin injuries; communicable and infectious disease control procedures; extremity trauma; medical emergencies; ambulance operations; patient care documentation and history taking; domestic violence; environmental emergencies; critical incident stress management; trauma intervention; stress and burnout; behavioral emergencies; triage (simple triage and rapid treatment); IV maintenance; emergency medical action plan; multiple casualty incidents; track safety; hazardous materials awareness; blood borne pathogens; AIDS and HIV awareness; on-scene personnel safety; pediatric emergencies; OB/GYN lifts and carries; kinematics; EMT-Defibrillation; critical trauma care; airway maintenance and oxygen therapy; history taking; FDNY-EMS operating guide procedures; communications orientation; special operations; respiratory fit testing; Right to Know; personnel and union representatives issues. (Prerequisite: Employment with FDNY-EMS as a New York State certified EMT.)
Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (10/07 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours as follows:  2 semester hours in Physical Education, 1 semester hour in Emergency Vehicle Operation, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health, and Emergency Medical Services (7/10). NOTE: Rather than deduct the instructional hours for EVOC and Refresher, which have separate credit recommendations, the hours for this course and the resulting credit recommendation are reflected in full to benefit those individuals who will not take these other learning experiences. Care should be taken not to award duplicate credit. Also refer to the next note. NOTE: Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, Emergency Medical Technician - Refresher Course, and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - EMT overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 10 semester hours.

Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic (PRH 303)

Location: Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: Time requirements vary depending upon background of class participants. Paramedic-TOP (for new graduates of the FDNY-EMS sponsored Paramedic course or for individuals being hired by FDNY-EMS as paramedics, who received their training elsewhere): Version 1: 135 hours (17 days). (Instructional time does not include refresher time or EVOC time. Credit is recommended separately for these courses.) Version 2: 345 hours (46 days).(Instructional time includes Refresher time and EVOC time. Credit is recommended for EVOC separately and Refresher separately; therefore, please refer to the explanatory note at the end of this exhibit.) Version 3: 360 hours ( 49 days)
Dates: Version 1: January 1984 - September 2006. Version 2: October 2006 - June 2010. Version 3: July 2010- Present.
Objectives: Prepare a standardized patient care report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the A-EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; properly use and care for emergency equipment; operate safely at track rescues; identify, discuss, and function under multiple casualty incident conditions; categorize, treat, and transport a patient at the scene of a multi-casualty incident; recognize unsafe conditions at the scene of all calls and make proper decisions to ensure personnel safety; transfer, lift, and transport patients in all types of carrying devices; take necessary blood borne pathogens precautions; recognize and identify hazardous materials or potentials thereof; use the proper techniques of infectious waste disposal and personal protection in cases of known and unknown communicable diseases; identify and discuss Right to Know Law and how it operates; apply and function under the operating guide procedures.
Instruction: Version 1 or 2: This program is designed to provide a bridge between training programs and work in the field, as well as an orientation to FDNY-EMS policies and procedures. Topics include: Program orientation; medical-legal, patient assessment; vital signs; anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular emergencies; respiratory anatomy and physiology; respiratory emergencies; soft tissue injuries; shock and MAST; head, neck, and spine injuries; chest, abdomen, and groin injuries; communicable and infectious disease control procedures; extremity trauma; medical emergencies; ambulance operations; patient care documentation and history taking; domestic violence; environmental emergencies; critical incident stress management; trauma intervention; stress and burnout; behavioral emergencies; triage (simple triage and rapid treatment); IV maintenance; emergency medical action plan; multiple casualty incidents; track safety; hazardous materials awareness; blood borne pathogens; AIDS and HIV awareness; on-scene personnel safety; pediatric emergencies; OB/GYN lifts and carries; kinematics; EMT-Defibrillation; critical trauma care; airway maintenance and oxygen therapy; history taking; FDNY-EMS operating guide procedures; communications orientation; special operations; respiratory fit testing; Right to Know; personnel and union representatives issues. (Prerequisite: Employment with FDNY-EMS as a New York State certified Paramedic (AEMT) IV.) Version 3: Includes all of the above content in Versions 1 and 2 with added drills and technology updates.

Credit Recommendations

Credit recommendation: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (3/96) (10/01 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Sciences, Allied Health Sciences or Emergency Health Sciences (10/07 revalidation). Version 3:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 credits in Health Sciences, Allied Health, and Emergency Medical Services' or in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology, 1 semester hour in EVOC, and 1 semester hour in Physical Education (7/10). NOTE: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP), and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.